Retirement Income

The retirement income guide for Canadian non-resident expats

The retirement income guide for Canadian non-resident expats

Retirement income planning for Canadian non-resident expatriates can be difficult. Let’s consider some of the implications of receiving CPP/QPP, OAS, RRSP and pension income in retirement.

CPP/QPP and OAS

Canadians living abroad can apply for and receive government pensions like Canada Pension Plan (CPP), Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) and Old Age Security (OAS) in retirement.

Non-residents can begin their CPP/QPP pension as early as age 60, just like a Canadian resident.

OAS can start as early as age 65, but if you apply while you are a non-resident, you need to have resided in Canada for at least 20 years after the age of 18 to qualify.

Canada has international social security agreements that coordinate pension programs between countries for those who have lived abroad and contributed to multiple national pensions. Canada may consider your periods of contribution to foreign national pensions as periods of contribution to the CPP/QPP or periods of residency for calculating OAS entitlement. This is particularly important for OAS given the 20-year minimum residency threshold. A social security agreement may help you to qualify.

Some countries, like the United States, also have minimum thresholds to qualify for government retirement benefits. You need 10 years of contributions to the U.S. Social Security to qualify, but the totalization agreement between Canada and the U.S. can help someone who has worked for under 10 years in the U.S. qualify for enhanced retirement benefits when combined with the CPP/QPP.

Contact Service Canada if you have lived or worked abroad or are currently a non-resident applying for a government pension.

Of interest is that the Receiver General of Canada can also pay CPP/QPP and OAS benefits in local currency in 54 countries currently.

CPP/QPP and OAS paid to a non-resident of Canada is subject to a non-resident withholding tax that is 25% by default. Many countries have tax treaties with Canada that reduce the withholding tax rate – commonly to 15% tax.

This doesn’t mean that you must file a Canadian tax return. Withholding tax is generally your only tax obligation to Canada as a non-resident.

Many countries will tax foreign pension income, though some, like the United States, tax only a portion. There is an 85% inclusion rate for CPP/QPP and OAS on a U.S. tax return and a corresponding 85% inclusion rate for U.S. Social Security on a Canadian tax filing.

It’s important to understand the tax implications in the country where you reside. Withholding tax at source in Canada will often be credited towards tax payable in your country of residence.

You can apply to have your withholding tax on your CPP/QPP or OAS reduced further. According to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA): “As a non-resident, it may be beneficial for you to elect under section 217 of the Canadian Income Tax Act to pay tax at the same rate as residents of Canada on your Canadian-source pensions or other benefits.”

In other words, if your income is low, 15% or 25% or whatever required withholding tax rate applies may be too high. Section 217 allows a non-resident to calculate the applicable tax payable as if they were a resident so that they are no worse off than if they lived in Canada and paid tax on that income. If someone has little to no other income beyond their CPP/QPP and OAS, there is a good chance a section 217 would benefit them, particularly if their pensions are not taxed in their country of residence or are taxed at a low rate.

The application form to elect under section 217 can be found here. You can also file a section 217 tax return after the fact to request a retroactive refund if eligible.

There is an OAS Recovery Tax if your net world income for the year exceeds a threshold, which is $74,789 for 2017 (a threshold that is generally increased each year with inflation). The recovery tax is calculated based on an Old Age Security Return of Income you must file each year to report your net world income. There are currently 42 countries that have a tax treaty with Canada so that OAS Recovery Tax does not apply regardless of income.

RRSPs

Income and growth in a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) is considered tax-free in many foreign countries. Canada has numerous tax treaties that deal with the taxation of various income sources, including “pensions and annuities” like RRSPs.

Non-residents generally don’t contribute to RRSPs, because if they aren’t filing Canadian tax returns, RRSP contributions won’t provide a tax deduction like if they were residents.

Investing can be tricky as a non-resident, as some financial institutions cannot or will not work with foreigners (though RRSPs are often exempt). Certain Canadian investments cannot be purchased by non-residents either, though they can often continue to be held if you owned them before becoming a non-resident.

Withholding tax rates on RRSP withdrawals depend on the nature of the withdrawal. A lump-sum withdrawal is taxed, by default, at 25%. A periodic withdrawal, like a Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF) withdrawal in retirement, may be eligible for a reduced withholding tax rate – most often 15% depending on the tax treaty between Canada and your country of residence.

This doesn’t mean that you must file a Canadian tax return. Withholding tax is generally your only tax obligation to Canada as a non-resident.

You can apply to have your withholding tax on your RRSP/RRIF withdrawals reduced further. According to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA): “As a non-resident, it may be beneficial for you to elect under section 217 of the Canadian Income Tax Act to pay tax at the same rate as residents of Canada on your Canadian-source pensions or other benefits.”

In other words, if your income is low, 15% or 25% or whatever required withholding tax rate applies may be too high. Section 217 allows a non-resident to calculate the applicable tax payable as if they were a resident so that they are no worse off than if they lived in Canada and paid tax on that income. If someone has little to no other income beyond their RRSP/RRIF withdrawals, there is a good chance a section 217 would benefit them, particularly if their withdrawals are not taxed in their country of residence or are taxed at a low rate.

The application form to elect under section 217 can be found here. You can also file a section 217 tax return after the fact to request a retroactive refund if eligible.

Most countries will tax foreign pension income, like RRSP/RRIF withdrawals. It’s important to understand the tax implications of the country where you reside. Withholding tax at source in Canada will often be credited towards tax payable in your country of residence.

Some countries do not tax foreign pension income, like RRSP/RRIF withdrawals. Some countries are tax-free jurisdictions that don’t tax any income at all. This may create strategic opportunities for Canadians to liquidate their registered accounts as non-residents.

If non-residents have locked-in accounts, like LIRAs, LRIFs, LIFs, etc. that came from pension plan transfers, these accounts can be unlocked if they have been non-residents for more than 2 years and transferred to a regular, non-locked-in registered account.

Pensions

Non-residency generally won’t impact your entitlement to a private workplace pension.

Pension income paid to a non-resident of Canada is subject to a non-resident withholding tax that is 25% by default. Many countries have tax treaties with Canada that reduce the withholding tax rate – commonly to 15% tax.

This doesn’t mean that you must file a Canadian tax return. Withholding tax is generally your only tax obligation to Canada as a non-resident.

It’s important to understand the tax implications of the country where you reside. Withholding tax at source in Canada will often be credited towards tax payable in your country of residence.

You can apply to have your withholding tax on your pension reduced further. According to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA): “As a non-resident, it may be beneficial for you to elect under section 217 of the Canadian Income Tax Act to pay tax at the same rate as residents of Canada on your Canadian-source pensions or other benefits.”

In other words, if your income is low, 15% or 25% or whatever required withholding tax rate applies may be too high. Section 217 allows a non-resident to calculate the applicable tax payable as if they were a resident so that they are no worse off than if they lived in Canada and paid tax on that income. If someone has little to no other income beyond a modest pension, there is a good chance a section 217 would benefit them, particularly if their pensions are not taxed in their country of residence or are taxed at a low rate.

The application form to elect under section 217 can be found here. You can also file a section 217 tax return after the fact to request a retroactive refund if eligible.

Some defined benefit (DB) pension plans allow members to take lump-sum commuted value payouts in exchange for giving up their future pension entitlement. Some or all of the payout may be eligible for transfer to a locked-in retirement account on a tax-deferred basis. Some portion may be taxable at a default 25% rate. This taxable portion may or may not be subject in your country of residence.

Once someone has been non-resident for 2 years, they can unlock their locked-in retirement accounts. Since some countries do not tax foreign pension income, like a locked-in retirement account withdrawal, this may create strategic opportunities for Canadians to liquidate their registered accounts as non-residents.

When interest rates are low, commuted value pension payouts are high, meaning favourable conditions currently exist to consider commuted value payouts.

Comments

  1. Jeff

    In this day and age of electronic banking is it necessary to set up these formal arrangements. If these various pensions are deposited directly into your Canadian bank account, in which, as a senior, you pay no service charges, could you not then transfer the funds electronically to your Mexican or Italian bank? This seems like it would be more convenient and involve less logistical headaches, particularly if you were only spending six months of each year outside Canada. Thanks.

    • Jason Heath

      Hi Jeff. You could have the deposits go to a Canadian bank account. I guess it depends where you want to spend the money. If you’re spending it in Mexico, it may be easier to have it go into a Mexican bank account into Mexican pesos. Foreign exchange costs can be 2%+ to move from one currency to another, though there are ways around that too.

      It’s a convenience to get CPP/OAS paid in a foreign currency to a foreign bank account. I’m surprised Service Canada goes through the trouble, but maybe it’s easier and cheaper than issuing 12 cheques a year to a non-resident.

  2. Pat

    Can a Canadian Citizens transfer their superannuation (University pensions) accumulated while working in Australia to a Canadian RRSP or LIRA? Are there any tax implications. Thank you.

    • Jason Heath

      You will probably be able to make the transfer, Pat. Section 60(j)(i) of the Canadian Income Tax Act allows transfers of foreign superannuations or pension benefits to an RRSP. Get advice from an accountant and make sure you understand the tax withholding in Australia and tax deduction and credit in Canada to ensure there is little to no tax leakage.

  3. Peter B

    Great article.
    I believe hat if one collects only the minimum RIF payout required, then no withholding tax applies at all.

    • Jason Heath

      Hi Peter. If a Canadian resident takes the minimum RRIF withdrawal, there is no required tax withheld at source (though some people choose to have tax withheld). The withdrawal is still taxable on your tax return with tax calculated accordingly, so having no tax withheld doesn’t mean you won’t pay tax. It’s different for a resident though. Periodic withdrawals, like monthly or annual RRIF withdrawals, generally have 15% tax withheld. Lump-sum withdrawals – like cashing in your entire account – would have 25% withheld.

  4. David Nicholson

    “Some countries do not tax foreign pension income, like RRSP/RRIF withdrawals. Some countries are tax-free jurisdictions that don’t tax any income at all. This may create strategic opportunities for Canadians to liquidate their registered accounts as non-residents”

    Please share a listing of the aforementioned countries…

    • Jason Heath

      Hi Dave. I don’t know it there is a central list. It’s all based on the tax treaties between Canada and the country in question. Here is a list of in-force tax treaties that Canada has, but you’d have to go through on a country by country basis: https://www.fin.gc.ca/treaties-conventions/in_force–eng.asp.

      International taxation is complicated, but in order for you to have your RRSP withdrawal free from taxation, you’d have to literally live in the country in question and break ties with Canada. That has other consequences because when you leave Canada, you dispose of your worldwide assets for capital gains tax purposes. You also lose health benefits. But keep in mind, even if the income is not taxable in the other country, you will still have withholding tax in Canada (15% or 25% as the case may be). So there is always tax to pay somewhere when it comes to an RRSP.

  5. phil cooper

    Jason, Do you know how the exchange rate is determined for receiving CPP in a different currency ? Thanks, Phil

  6. maria fernandez

    what do you mean ?? u still ahve to pay taxes in canada , no?

    • Jason Heath

      If someone is considered a Canadian resident, they are taxable on their worldwide income and file a Canadian tax return each year.

      If someone is considered non-resident and breaks ties with Canada, establishing residency in another country, they may just be subject to withholding tax ranging from 0-25% depending on the source of income and the country of residency.

  7. Mike

    One topic you didn’t mention is income splitting. My wife and I are considering moving overseas for our retirement (Central America or Mexico). The Canada Revenue site seems to imply that you must reside in Canada for income splitting purposes.

    I assume as a couple you can’t use this strategy if you live outside of Canada?

    • Jason Heath

      If you are truly a non-resident of Canada, you may not need to file a Canadian tax return any more (except for certain types of income like rental income).

      Pension income and RRSP/RRIF withdrawals will generally be subject to withholding tax at source of 15-25% tax depending on country of residency, but won’t require a Canadian tax return (therefore no pension income splitting).

  8. Marita Parisi

    I am now an American citizen, collecting minimal Social Security…$591.
    I lived in Canada for over 40 years, taught for 16, contributed to CPP.
    I was led to believe that I could collect only one…America SS or CPP, not both.
    It seems to me that there should be a way of collecting both since I contributed to both?
    I have tried to figure out the rationale, but the jargon is beyond me.
    Could you please explain how I can collect CPP….needless to say, I cannot survive on SS. I am 72 working my way through savings I thought would be enough….
    I would appreciate any help you can give.

  9. Igor

    Hi Jason,

    I am 52 now and since I spent only six years in Canada (2002-2008), I’m not eligible for the OAS. Is it possible for me to open and regularly contribute my own funds to some Canadian bank’s account solely for retirement purpose?
    Thanks,

    • Doug Runchey

      Hi Igor – Depending on what other country(ies) you have lived/worked in, you may still be eligible for OAS under one of the many international social security agreements that Canada has. Here is a website that lists those countries: https://www.canada.ca/en/services/benefits/publicpensions/cpp/cpp-international/apply.html

      • Igor

        Doug, thanx for your swift response.
        No, “my” country doesn’t have that agreement with Canada.
        So in the worst case scenario, is there any option for me to open some “retirement account” or convert my existing day-t-day saving account in a Canadian bank into it?

        • Doug Runchey

          Hi Igor – Sorry, but my expertise is limited to the CPP and OAS programs. Hopefully somebody else who knows the answer will respond to that part of your question.

  10. peter lewis

    I have worked in Canada from 16 years old until I was around 22 years old. I have been living in Mexico since 23 years old…now I am 48 years old. I suppose I am entitled to nothing, correct?
    Peter.

  11. Karen Kelly

    hi what about income level from pension in the UK of around $32K per year – i am thinking to withdraw my Canadian RRSP – should i consider using s. 217 calculation to try to bring down withholding tax to 15% – do you think i would qualify for the reduced rate? I am living in the UK for 20+ years now.

  12. Kelly Megson

    I seem to have a dilemma. I’m a non resident living in the US for past 20 years. I have RRSP and LIRA with National Bank. They want to charge me a Management fee on my portfolio now but I do my own investing. If I wanted to leave them and open a discount brokerage account elsewhere I’ve been told another company can’t do that. What are my options

  13. Thom

    Hello Peter
    Your website has been clarifying. Thank you.
    If I have something akin to an RRSP in the United States (which I have been told I can transfer to a Canadian RRSP) and I am choosing to have it paid out in monthly increments…do I need to pay both USA taxes and potentially Canadian taxes? I will be a resident of Belgium but I will pay my taxes in Canada (as under section 217 mentioned above).

  14. Bob

    I’m about to retire and have a defined benefit pension. My spouse will have very little pension besides CPP and OAS. We are going to be residents of Australia (tax treaty so 15% withholding tax) and from what I can see it looks like they won’t recognize pension splitting. That will make a huge difference in our tax situation. There is a 4 year difference in age so perhaps I could transfer money into here RRSP for the first while. Does earning a pension in Canada allow you to make RRSP contributions? Otherwise a divorce would split the pension, but would be a problem when one of us dies!

  15. Paul Frydl

    I just received my first CPP payment and notice they have not deducted any tax. I live in the US and am a non resident of Canada for tax purposes, consequently do not file a Canadian Tax Return. Since they are not withholding any tax, how is this going to be handled at the end of the year?

  16. Stacey Odlum

    Hello, I’m 62 and living in France. I requested my French pension at the end of last year and it has started. They are suggesting that I need to start my Canadian one as well. Is this a valid requirement? I had planned to wait until 65 at least for my Canadian Pension.
    Thanks in advance.
    Stacey

    • Doug Runchey

      Hi Stacey – There’s nothing in the Canadian legislation that wold require you to apply for your CPP now, but I have no expertise in the legislation governing benefits from France. If you would also be eligible to OAS from Canada, you definitely can’t receive that until age 65 or later.

  17. Johanna Martin

    My husband and I are both Canadians, retired, living in Belgium but never have received Belgium revenue. My husband worked for an American missions society, working in Belgium, for 20 years. We both receive US Social Security, OAS,& QPP, (we left Canada after working in Quebec for close to 20 years). We have elected section 217. Question: What kind of deductions can we claim for tax reimbursements? Clergy housing, is I think, no longer tax deductable after retirement, but is this correct? My husband still holds clergy status in Canada. And what about tax deductions for charity contributions to a Canadian registered charity?

  18. Angelo

    Hi,

    My father is a Canadian, non-resident and he received the NR4 and NR4(OAS) for 2018 from CRA.
    He lives in Greece now and and his gross income is no more than 6,000 CAD.
    Does he still have to fil the return? He has no more income other than CPP reported in those forms.

    Thanks!

  19. Arthur Read

    Att; Mr. Doug Runchey.
    I have lived in Quito,Ecuador for the past 15 years as a non-resident of Canada.
    A rumour has started that the CRA is considering Legistlation in December of this year requiring all Canadian Citizens to spend 183 days in Canada to continue to receive the OAS + Child Tax Benefit.?
    Do you have any knowledge if this is a fact or not.
    Thanking you so very much for your anticipated reply.
    Arthur W. Read,
    Quito.
    Ecuador

    • Doug Runchey

      Hi Arthur – I suspect that such a requirement (or some similar requirement) already exists to receive the CTB, but I haven’t heard of any such proposed changes to OAS.

  20. Eric Schuck

    Great article. One more question that has not been discussed. We are Canadian citizens living in the US since 1994 as resident aliens. We are getting ready to retire. Can we apply for our Canadian Social Insurance at age 60 and wait until 65 to apply for our Social Security to minimize the WEP impact?

  21. connie

    I have a locked in LIF in Canada and have been declared a non-resident. I was told that being a non-resident requires me to either take out all of the money at once (non investments left) or don’t touch it. I was also told that if I took all of the money out of the LIF, I could not later open a RRIF because I am a non-resident. So, I want to transfer my LIF to a RRIF. Is this possible? I want to transfer it so my investments are kept while being allowed to take out money.

    • connie

      Found out it is possible, but I need to fly to Canada to open a new retirement fund Ughhhh!

  22. jennifer

    hello
    can you confirm for me that the uk/canada tax treaty means there is zero withholding tax on both cpp and oap please
    also would you think it better to have these deposited in your local bank in the uk as opposed to in Canada as a non resident
    thank you

  23. James

    Hello – If I become a resident of Italy…will my RRSP’s be subject to tax or is this a country “treaty) with Canada that does to charge taxes/

    Thank you

  24. Gae Scott

    HI Jason, we are going to retire in Australia from Canada. I’m an Australian citizen and my husband is Canadian. We both have company pension plans, RRSPs, CPP and OAS (when we turn 65). I have read the tax treaty information but don’t find it very helpful. My question is, will we taxed in Australia on our Canadian income? I understand that we will taxed at the source at the rate of 15%. Is there anyway to avoid this especially if we are taxed in Australia. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

  25. Rick

    My wife and I are moving to Costa Rica next year and will only have RRSP’s , CPP and OAS when we turn 65. We are retiring and will not be working there. Do we still have to file tax returns? Also do you know if we would pay income tax there?
    Thanks Rick

  26. Shah

    My wife & I we will be moving back to India permanently next year (2020). Both of currently get OAS and CPP in Canada.

    We will be non resident from next year for tax purposes. India has no tax treaty with Canada as far as I know, so a 25% withholding tax will be held on my OAS.

    Besides OAS and CPP, I won’t be gee any other income from Canada so obviously obviously our Canadian income will be low. So does that mean, I will get back the 25% withholding tax when I file my Canadian return from India as a non resident.

    Also do I have to report my Indian income when I file my return in Canada as a non resident? I will have significant Interest income from banks in India, when I move there.

    Will they include that income while calculating the withholding OAS tax or recovery OAS tax although I am a non resident of Canada?

  27. SHAH

    If we file a NR5 form and a Old Age Security Return of Income form, when we move to India per next year and bec a Non Resident of Canada, do we still have to file a regular Canada Income Tax return to get OAS & CPP abroad in India?

    Right now both I and my wife we are getting OAS & CPP.

    I think India and Canada have a social security treaty, but NO tax treaty. My world wide income won’t be much after I move to India permanently.

    It will be mostly OAS, CPP and bank savings account interest in India.

    So will the NR5 form get rid of the 25% withholding tax on CPP & OAS ?

    Will the OASRI form be eno to continue getting OAS & CPP in India ? Or do I have to file an IT CRA return for both of us in addition?

    Also should both of us fill the NR5 and OASRI forms? Or only I fill the forms and just Write my wife’s SIN on the form?

    Thanks

  28. SHAH

    By low income, do you mean just the income you receive in Canada from Canadian sources like OAS and CPP?

    Or do you also include the income like bank interest income, which you will get in the foreign country that now you will be a resident of?

    My wife and I get OAS and CPP in Canada, that is pretty low. But we will be getting significant bank interest in India. It will be below the OAS claw back amount, but well above the Canada revenue perso exemption amount.

    So do we go for Section 217 or not?

    —+++
    In other words, if your income is low, 15% or 25% or whatever required withholding tax rate applies may be too high. Section 217 allows a non-resident to calculate the applicable tax payable as if they were a resident so that they are no worse off than if they lived in Canada and paid tax on that income. If someone has little to no other income beyond their CPP/QPP and OAS, there is a good chance a section 217 would benefit them, particularly if their pensions are not taxed in their country of residence or are taxed at a low rate.

  29. Maria

    what woulod be most convenient for a non resident canadian with Oas and RRQ and RRSP withdrawls moving let say to Europe for their retirement:
    1- leave bank account in Montreal where OAS RRQ and RRSP withdralws would accumulate and no cost as senior citizen and do income tax declaration in Montreal as a non-resident . Withdrawl money to european account as needed
    2- close accounts in Montreal , send OAS , RRQ and RRSP withdrawls to european account with the tax treaty tax deducted and in EUR and not do a non-resident income tax declaration in Canada

    thanks

    Maria

  30. Eli

    Hello,
    I have a question on this topic. Is there a way for non-resident parents who have not lived in Canada to receive pension under any rules related to their children who are resident? Imagine a recent resident person who just received his PR in Canada and want to make a pension for his 65 year old parents to come and live permanently in Canada. How much money does it need or under which type of visa and other principles should he apply?
    There is a similar position in Australia and I was wondering if Canada has the same rule.
    I will be happy if anyone can help me.

    Thank you
    Eli

    • Doug Runchey

      Hi Eli – There is no such provision in Canada.

  31. David Yli-Juuti

    Hello,
    I am a Canadian who moved to the UK in 2003.
    I and 2 partners who live in Canada have owned a limited company that in turn owned an apartment building in Canada.
    The building sold last month, and we have been told by our accountant that there is an amount of money that the partners can take as a dividend tax-free. Apparently, the taxes on this extra dividend have been offset against the Canadian corporate capital gains tax paid when our company sold the property.
    What I would like to know is whether the tax-free dividend would apply to me in the UK as well.
    Thank you.

  32. Ron

    Regarding TFSA”s, i understand non-residents will have 25% withholding tax imposed on all withdrawals regardless of any tax treaties that may exist. Will the withholding tax on TFSA’s be reduced by electing Section 217 if ones income is low?

  33. Maria Fernandez

    hi , if i retire in Spain and ask for RRQ or OAS , would i receive it without the 25% tax or would gov apply treaty between Canada-Spain and apply the 15% ? is it same for RRIF? by being a fiscal resident of Spain i ll have to do my income tax return in Spain and not sure if Spain will tax again , any advice or information on this? i know is not a good deal to withdraw all complete RRIF while in Canada as taxed a lot but if ill be taxed in Spain as much while resident of spain then won’t be beneficiary for me to even keep them in Canada . Suggestions ?

  34. Anupam Sharma

    Hi, I am an Indian citizen. Had worked in Canada from 2010-2013 (work permit). During my assignment my company had contributed in the pension fund. As I have no intention to come back to Canada , what will happen to my pension fund? Am I eligible to request for the withdrawal? any pointer would help?

  35. Joe

    Hi
    My wife and I are thinking of retiring in Malaysia under a special program MM2H .
    They provide a 10 year visa.
    We want to maintain our Canadian citizenship . Is this possible as we may think of returning , if this does not work out in 10 years.
    Can we keep our ties To Canada by getting to vote , we have RRSP and LIRA accounts that we would like to cash out after about 5 years from now .
    Your input will be greatly appreciated.

  36. john redman

    Hello. I worked at NATO in Brussels as international staff, while on leave from the Canadian government. Because I was on leave, I was a Canadian deemed resident. I retired from the Canadian government and continued in the same NATO job for another 10 years. I believe that I keep deemed resident status because I was still working at NATO, and still declaring the NATO salary to the CRA. What is your interpretation of this case please?

  37. Hasha Usanovic

    Hello, My mother and father Lived in France from 1964-1969. They both worked for larger companies there. They have lived in Canada since the end of 1969 until present and both receive Canada Old age and CPP pension. Are they eligible to get a foreign pension from France for the years they worked and contributed there? They are presently respectfully 77 and 80 years old. Do you know if they are entitled to any minimal amount and if so will they receive any residuals from the retirement age from France. Thank you

  38. Kourosh M.H.

    Hi I am a Canadian-Iranian residing in Iran since 2015. I have worked in Toronto and contributed to CPP since 1980/1985 until 2015. I will be 63 in December 2020 and would like to apply and receive my CPP benefits and if possible OAS. I planned to return to Canada this year however due to some circumstances I am not able to do. My Q’s are 1) how my I apply and receive my benefits from the outside of Canada, if it is possible at all? 2) Could I give “A power of attorney (POA)” let say to a good friend of mine in Canada to apply on my behalf and have it direct-deposited into my CIBC Bank account. So I may withdraw funds from it if and when I need it
    3) I have zero income in Canada and in Iran. I am living off the interest of my savings in Iran which is not taxed. Could I make a section 217 election to reduce the withholding tax?
    I will be grateful for any advice you can provide

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